Wednesday, April 23, 2014

T is for Tantalus Tortured in Tartarus

Day 20 of Blogging from A to Z.  Today’s letter is T

T is for Tantalus Tortured in Tartarus

tantalus tortured
tipple and taste beyond reach
hubris’ consequence

As capricious as the ancient gods were, they meted out some well deserved punishments. Unlike today, when we have a shooter of children on film and still
call him the alleged shooter.

Ah Zeus, where are you when we need you.

© Perle Champion


The punishment of Tantalus in Tartarus is to stand knee deep in water but be unable to slake his thirst because whenever he bends down, the water vanishes. Over his head hangs fruit, but whenever he reaches for it, it goes just beyond his reach. From this punishment Tantalus is familiar to us in the word tantalize.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

S is for Seek, Seas, beyond the Strand…

Day 19 of Blogging from A to Z.  Today’s letter is S

S is for Seek, Seas, Strand…

to seek out new seas
one must abandon the strand
lose sight of the shore

Many people opt to stay securely on that narrow strand. Perhaps they’ll
wonder what lies beyond across the sea.  Perhaps they’ll wonder what lies inland as well.  

Alas, fear holds them fast.  They might take a hesitant step seaward, but the ventured foot sinks deep as the eager current’s pull makes footing unsure.  They might step inland, but here too the shifting sands make footing once more unsure.

And so they remain on their small path wondering but never knowing what lies beyond.


© Perle Champion

Monday, April 21, 2014

The Rock of Ritual & Rote

Day 18 of Blogging from A to Z.  Today’s letter is R

R is for the Rock of Ritual & Rote

with rote of ritual
rock bottom can become our
solid foundation

© Perle Champion

Ritual has many forms. Some as simple as making your morning coffee or tea; performing morning ablutions; etc.

I would add to those a few of my favorites – I’m sure you have more:
  • Taking my early morning walk, rain, shine or snow, sans the distraction of headgear, so I can listen to my own thoughts and the sounds of nature around me.
  • Writing stream-of-consciousness by hand in my journal on my return, before the noise of the day intrudes and crowds out my own internal voice.
  • Preparing food for the day whether breakfast, lunch or dinner.  The cracking of an egg, butter on toast; the simple act of dicing carrots, celery, pickles for a tuna salad; julienning vegetables for a stir fry.  All these rote preparations have a Zen affect when we pay attention.
  • Lighting candles on my small home altar.
  • Stroking my cat’s soft fur and relishing her soft purr as we settle on the couch with a good book and a glass of Pinot Noir.
  • Writing in my gratitude journal a list of at least 5 things I am grateful for before turning out the lights at night.


If we stop and pay attention to the small rote rituals of our day they can be that rock that anchors us after an otherwise stormy day.


What are some of yours?

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Q Is for Quodlibet, Quibbles & Quarrels

Day 17 of Blogging from A to Z.  Today’s letter is Q

Q Is for Quodlibet, Quibbles & Quarrels

quodlibet quibbles
grow to quarrels when questioned
mules wearing blinders??
there is only one

© Perle Champion

Quodlibet is a disputation on a philosophical or theological point.  These days few
people or nations, for that matter, know how to have civilized discourse or debate on their preconceived ideals or the issues of the day. 

Each person or nation stands firm, determined to convince the other at the outset that their belief is the only truth one and all others are wrong.  There is rarely an open mind on either side.  (Kierkegaard says it best; see quote below). 

I no longer discuss, and rarely voice my beliefs to certain people, because it just isn’t worth my time.  I most certainly don’t have the patience with someone that believes if they shout loud enough and drown out other viewpoints, then they win.  I’m not sure what they think they win except to shut out any possibility of learning something new.


“The most terrible fight is not when there is one opinion against another, the most terrible is when two men say the same thing – and fight about the interpretation, and this interpretation involves a difference of quality.”


 – Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) Danish Philosopher. The Journals of Søren Kierkegaard: A selection, no 1057 (ed. And tr. By Alexander, 1938), 1850 entry.